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-4.' isro^vr.*/ irivw -P*’ had identified 8 65 lakh marginal farmers and 7 62 lakh agricultural labourers by the end of March 1973 Out of them as many as 3 5' \akbs Jiad been enrolled as members of Coope lauvcs to enable them to obtain cred I from the Cooperative institutions in connection wjih thr various programmes of these projects Dunng the period mentioned above 2J1 lakh farmers bad adopted improved agricultural practices and about 1 51 lakhs had benefited from other pro grammes lika minor irrigation soil conserva* lion, land development, subsidiary occupations, ttc The Agencies arc laying considerable cm phasis on the development of the individual as ilso community irrigation programmes for the marginal farmers in the project areas By March 1973 , 8,547 farmers had been asssted for ^ug wells/lubc wells and 3373 farmers to install pump sets Another 573 irrigation works like theck dams anient, etc , had been completed Subsidiary occupations are equally important for marginal farmers and agricultural labourers to 19-1 D L n simla/74 increase their income level As many as 15381 marginal farmers and agricultural labourers had been assisted to acquire milch cattle and 2320 of lh*m with poultry units The cooperatives as well as the commercial banks are financing the klcntilicd marginal farmers and agncutiural labourers to execute programmes of develop- ment During the year 1972 73, a sum of Rs 285 37 lakhs had bc-'n advanced as short term loans to the idvntified participants in the 41 projects Since the inception of these pro j-cts the cooperatives and the commercial banks had nude available term loans to the extent o( Rs 650-80 lakhs for land devdopment, subsi- diary occupations minor irrigation, etc £t 3 ig 14 Guyana 1972 7 50 000* 2 96 7701 39 37 13 Indonesa 1971 11 90 00 000 25 000 16 Jamaca 1972 19 20000* 27 912 l Easi Ind ans) 1 45 17 Kenya 1972 1 JO 70000* 1 39000** 18 Laos 1972 3200 000 1 OOOiippro* ) 19 Libera 1971 15 70000* 3253 20 Madaea Kat 1970 67 50000 15000® n 77 21 Malawi 1972 46 70 000* It 000** 22 Malaysia 1971 108 00 000 9 47 000 23 Maunilus 1972 8 31990 3 78 829 2t Mexico 1972 3 ■'6 40 000* 41** 35 New Zealand 1972 29 00 000* 6 000** 26 Oman 1972 7 00 000* 4A00Ce 0 37 284 Tire INDIAN LABOU* YEAR BOOK 1972 285 11 1 NUMBER AND PFJICENTACES OF PERSONS OF INDIAN ORIGIN TO TOTAL POPULATION OP IUFTI RENT COUNTRIt S-CMf J 1 2 3 4 5 6 27 Panama 197' IS 20 000* 565** 0 03 2$ Ph Iipp n« 190* 2 50030 0 01 29 St Vincent 1972 90 000* 2 780£ 3 09 30 Sierra Leone 1972 '6 30000* 423$ 0 O' 31 S nsapore 1972 21 0 the y^r 1970 71 t Re Utei lo the year 196$ Cf Relaiei to the year 1966 *• No Ubouren of Indun On^n were reported to be in Ucandadunng 1972 Bahnio There were about ^657 persons of fndian Origin in Bahrain out of an estimated total pypu lation of 2 16078 as on 3Ist December 1972 Exact information about the trades/mdustnes in nhich peopi of Indian Ocicin are empoye J ts not available There were 43 professionals l OS manageis 411 clerks 452 skilled md 224 un skilled workers of Ind an Oricin m Bahrain The professionals are paid monthly salary nng ing from BD 100 to 250 ^lonthly salary of the managers ranges from B D 80 to 380 that of clerical workers from 42 to 186 of skills workers from 30 to 170 and that of unskilled workers from 20 to 117 There is no set pattern regarding medical housing or cduca Uonal faoli ties provided to labourers of Indian Ongm or others.

Madhya Pr-desh and Uttar Pridcsh The mam provi- sions of the State Ads are given below senara lely — (al THE BOMBAY INDUSTRIAL RELA- TIONS ACT, 19465?

1 The Bombay Smoke Nuisance Act, 1912 Amended m 1953 2 The Bombay Labour Welfare Fund Act, 1953 Amended m 1956 1961, 19 3 The U P Sugar and Power Alcohol Industries Labour Welfare and Development Fund Act, 1950 4 The U P Labour Welfare Fund Act, 1965 5 The Mysore Labour Welfare Fund Act, 1965 6 The Punjab Labour Welfare Fund Act, 1963 7 The Maharashtra Mathadi, Hamat, and other Manu^ Workers (Regulation of Employmeot and Welfare) Act, 1969 8 Tamil Nadu Labour Welfare Fund Act, 1972 9 The Assam Tea Plantations Employees’ Welfare Act. The Madras Workmen's Protection Act, 1941 13 The Orissa Debt and Bondage Abolition Regnla- tion, 194S 14 The Punjab Registration of Accounts Act.

1959 SOCIAL SECURITY Central J The Workmen $ Compensation Act. 1930 15 The Punjab Relief of Indebtedness Act, 1934 16 The Punjab Debtors' Protection Act, 1936 17 The Punjab Regulation of Money Lenders' Act, 1936 18 The Saurashtra Agncultural Debtors’ Rehtf Art, 1954 MISCELLANEOUS Central 1 The Cotton Industry (Statistics) Act, 1926 Amended in 1950 2.

matters relatirs: to illecal strkes and lcs.k- outs, l*sal aid to repre-.entati\-e a'-pnted onions 31 Gotemmert etpenses m important prouecdin''s rroieclion to be given to emp’o^ees m cedain tasts and pcnaliiei.- for contravening tn; pro- visions of th; Act Since 1960 the Act has bc;n amend'd from time to tim* An Am Tdins Act was passed m 1^6^ empowenne Industnal and Labour Courts, to d»l cffcctiv-lv with the casts of contempt committed before them 11 MISCELL-WEOUS fa) THE CHILDREN (PLEDGING OF Lk BOLTl) ACT 19'ou"5 chi’dren bt t*'eir parents to emplovtrs m lieu of loans or advanc's The Act app’is to th; whole of India ft d*vfarcs void an acreement, wntt*n c* oral, to p’ede; the labour of a child below 1 ^ vears bv the child s parent or guardian n return for an Shop keepers 6 7 IS 21 Cm) Ntoney lenders • 3S 47 75 80 (iv) Co operauve Soeities 1 2 12 1* (v) Others 35 61 9lt3 91 (b) Perpose of Borromos (i) Production • ' 16 26 29 30 (ii) Gonsiinptio B 78 6i 130 130 (ill) Social • 17 33 59 62 (Iv) Others 15 25* 29 NOTS — ® Ii include* RS 1 for which source w. an increase of about 77 per cent Money lenders continued to be the mam source of borrowing About 53 f«r cent cf the aierage amount of debt was lor the purpose of consumption expenditure The incidence cf indebtedness was slightly less among other labour households ’han among agri- cultural lat Kaur households, but the amount of aieragc debt was higher among the formci Wniaic of Agncultnnl t*bor»tro (i) Emplosmcnt The basic maladv from which agricultural labourers suffer is the lack of adequate m,i Joy ment opportunitrs particul^rl) dunne the slack season resulting in wide spread under-cinplw- ment and consequently low Ici'c! to the extent possible- the following special Central programmes aim- ed at the creation of additional employment op- portunities for the weaker section of the rural ' society were in progress during 1972-73. 1972--74 As an outlay of Rs 100 crom schemes, with an estimated cost of over Rs 110 Al RICULt UBAt LAtl Ol K 2S1 crores ha\c already been cleared Of ih"« minor irrifianon schemes account for 54 per cent roads 25 per cent, soil conservation 8 per cent, aflorcstaiion 7 per cent, and otlim 6 ptr cent Since the inception of the programme, an tapendilurc of Rs 52 crores has bc-n incurnd till December 1972 Till S.